eLetters

68 e-Letters

published between 2003 and 2006

  • Stretching and hamstring strains
    Ian Shrier

    Dear Editor,

    I recently read the article by Dadebo et al with interest [1]. I am a little confused by their results and their take home message. First, the correlation for SHT is reported as 0.02 (Table 6) and 0.54 (Table 8, one predictor) when the two correlations should be equal [2]. Second, the appropriate analysis is Poisson regression with counts of injuries as outcome and exposure rates as a covaria...

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  • Blind-sided by fraud
    Eric N Grosch

    Dear Editor

    Pseudo-scientific detection of illusory entities did not end in 1907. Attributing physical mass to the “soul,” a man-made theological construct, exemplifies a fallacy Gould attributed to Mill:

    The tendency has always been strong to believe that whatever received a name must be an entity or being, having an independent existence of its own. And if no real entity answering to the name could be...

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  • High-energy versus low-energy protocols of shock wave application
    Jan D. Rompe

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest the article “Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for plantar fasciitis: randomised controlled multicentre trial” by John Ogden (Br J Sports Med 38: 382, 2004).

    I strongly contradict his suggestion that multiple dosed, low-energy, non-anaesthetically based treatments [9] cannot accomplish the same clinical outcome and patient satisfaction as single dosed, high-energy, ana...

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  • FATIGUE AS ONLY EMOTION ?
    CELIO LEVYMAN.MD,MSc

    Dear Editor,

    This a very interesting, but curious,paper.The novel theory presented, enhanced the CNS as the more important center regulatory of exercise fatigue, resembles all the research that occupied the minds of clinical and experimental neuroscience people in regard of pain.

    Pain is a reality, an alarm signal. Of course there are many pain syndromes as diseases by thereselfes, as migraine, cluster h...

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  • Might enteric or intraperitoneal oxygen improve performance?
    Richard G Fiddian-Green

    Dear Editor

    Judging from our animal studies, there is an opportunity to improve performance by supplementing hepatic oxygenation from an enteric or even a peritoneal source.

    The idea might be especially appealing to the armed forces but might conceivably be applied in a manner conducive to endurance sports. In our study oxygenating just half of the gut eliminated the compensatory increase in cardiac outp...

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  • Reply to authors' comments
    Ercan Cetinus

    Dear Editor

    Our reply to the comments raised by an author is submitted as follows. Author Comment (AC):I would be very interested to know what the authors actually mean by the term “shin splints”

    Reply: Shin splints, which we cited in our article as one of the main causes of recurrent lower leg pain, refers to a condition that produces pain and discomfort in the leg owing to repetitive running or hiki...

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  • Cardiovascular adaptation in hypoxia
    Erdem Kasikcioglu

    Dear Editor

    I read with great interest the recently published study by Shave et al.[1] in the February, 2004 issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine. The authors found that exercise training in hypoxic environment did not affect cardiac systolic and diastolic functions. However, it is known that the characteristics of the study population (broad age range, aerobic exercise capacity) may cause significantl...

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  • Lots of good sports not a lot of good sports to play them
    Richard Clarke Cobey

    Dear Editor

    I must fully concur with Dr McCrory's assessment of youth sport. Here in the US, we have a great many fathers find enjoyment in coaching their children-however there are far more whom become engulfed in the desire to win at all cost, pushing their children, dramatizing local saturday morning football as if it were the Super Bowl or World Cup. I find it highly objectionable to their behavior and the role...

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  • Re: Exercise induced compartment syndrome in a professional footballer
    Mike R Barnes

    Dear Editor

    There are a number of interesting points raised by this case report, as well as some fundamental and misleading errors.

    I would be very interested to know what the authors actually mean by the term “shin splints”

    They state that “Exercise-induced compartment syndrome is the least common” (cause of lower leg pain). Perhaps exercise-induced acute compartment syndromes are very rare, bu...

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  • Authors' Reply: chiropractic spinal manipulation for back pain
    E Ernst

    Dear Editor

    McCarthy, Byfield [1] and Breen [2] make a number of comments which require a brief reply. I wrote the article on this specific subject because I was invited to do so by the British Journal of Sports Medicine. All three correspondents seem to oppose my "long track record" of writing about adverse effects of spinal manipulation. I do this simply because it is my job. I try to apply the rules of science to al...

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